APA Film


2003 FILM FESTIVAL SPECIAL PROGRAMS


Mother and Daughters, Together and Apart
A Panel Discussion

Smithsonian Institution
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Meyer Auditorium
Saturday, October 11, 3:45-5:00 PM

Follows "Mother, Where Are We?" a collection of Asian Pacific Islander short films dealing with mother/daughter relationships.

Whether in Asia, or America, or anywhere else in the world, mothers and daughters share the challenge of trying to reconcile traditional roles and expectations with the realities of the society around them. Our panel looks at this important bond, with an eye toward the personal, professional and economic stresses-and ties-that act upon the mother-daughter dynamic in Asian American families.



Joined at the Hip: America and Vietnam Today
A Panel Discussion

Smithsonian Institution
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Meyer Auditorium
Sunday, October 12, 3:45-5:00 PM

Nearly three decades after the war in Vietnam ended for America, the events continue to evoke controversy and pain in both countries. How does America-and Vietnam-continue to grapple with the war and its aftermath? And how has the blossoming of the Vietnamese American community affected how the two nations see each other?



Korean American Adoptees: Crossing Borders and Categories
A Panel Discussion

Goethe-Institut

Thursday, October 16, 8:30-9:30 PM

Since the end of the Korean War, over 150,000 Korean children have been adopted in over 20 countries around the world. As each generation of adoptees grows older, they must deal with the realities of navigating their identities across cultural, familial, and national borders. This panel addresses the ways in which adoptees and adopted identity challenge notions of traditional family structure, racial consciousness, and belonging to the Asian American community.



Asian Communities Abroad
A Panel Discussion

American History Museum

Saturday, October 18, 1:30-2:30 PM

Join our panel for a look at how various Asian American groups been able to build a sense of community-both physically and virtually-in America. Are there differences between how various ethnic communities maintain a “home within a home?” And how does the younger generation in particular balance a sense of dual identities?