Closing Night - The Killing of a Chinese Cookie + Closing Night Reception

Saturday, Oct 4th, 2008 - 8:30 PM

Venue: United States Navy Memorial

Advance (Online)PriceDoor SalesPrice
General$12General$15
Senior 65+/ Students$10Senior 65+/ Students$15
Group (min 6 tickets)$10

The Closing Night Reception with the director will follow the screening of the film at Civilian Art Projects. All attendees at the film will receive a special free gift courtesy of Harris Teeter! We'll also be raffling off a pair of tickets for a Washington Capitals vs. New Jersey Devils hockey game, DC Improv tickets, as well as numerous gift certificates to various restaurants around town!

Cookies for Sale

Directed by Wes Kim

Running Time: 6 minutes
Year: 2007
Narrative Fiction
Language(s):

Website: http://www.weskim.com

A determined little girl must win over the neighborhood grouch in order to sell her last box of cookies.

The Killing of a Chinese Cookie

Directed by Derek Shimoda

Running Time: 75 minutes
Year: 2007
Documentary
Language(s): English

Website:

“Something you lost will soon turn up.”
“A pleasant surprise is in store for you.”
“Fame, riches and romance are yours for the asking.”

If you have ever eaten at a Chinese restaurant in America, you are probably quite familiar with the ritual of receiving a small, crispy cookie containing a thin piece of paper at the end of the meal. But what does this tradition, which is virtually unknown in China, really represent? Does it perpetuate the stereotype that Asians are the purveyors of ancient spiritual philosophy? Is it merely a small diversion that can be taken as a joke? Or could it hold the key to one’s future?

Director Derek Shimoda travels throughout the country in an attempt to document the truth behind the history of the fortune cookie from how it influences the choices people make to the impact it has on the world around us. Rife with humor and featuring an eclectic mix of interviews with people like master chef Martin Yan and Giant Robot founder Eric Nakamura, this film reveals how this edible invention has evolved from after dinner treat to cultural phenomenon. Not only is the cookie a source of post-meal entertainment, it has left its mark on the pop culture landscape, influencing areas of art, film, fashion, and beyond.